About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
KPIX (CBS) 9
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
saved more than 200 people during hurricane katrina. and this time around, they say they will stay on the east coast, as long as they are needed. melissa harrington, cbs 5. >> thank you very much. >>> sandy is packing strong winds. upwards of 100 miles an hour. >> it is. let's led over to lawrence now with the latest on sandy's path. lawrence, take it away. >> late-season hurricane, make can its way along the eastern seaboard. what is amazing with the storm is not the strength but it is such a large storm. so the potential for damage over a wide scattered area and a densely populated area, it is going to be a major problem. right now, sustained winds of 90 miles an hour making it a category one. but this is expected to sweep on shore later today and as it moves onshore, a very large storm surge. i will tell you what. new york probably in the worst spot. it is in the right front quadrant of the storm system. you have the forward motion of the waves coming onshore and the winds wrapping it around taking the winds back in the harbor and they could see 8-11- foot storm surge. and are a
. that's the second most expensive storm to hit the united states right behind katrina. at least 90 people confirmed dead. 4.5 million in 12 states are still without power tonight. sharon chin shows us how desperate many people have become. >> reporter: some of the subway lines are rolling again, but many people are finding recovery slow. they're out of gas, out of food, and out of patience. tensions flair on the road to new york city. >> i got no gas. >> stop it! >> step back. >> reporter: traffic jams and gas lines stretched for miles in a commute of chaos. >> get in front of me if it makes you happy. >> reporter: some stations ran out of fuel or power for pumps. aaa says only a third of the stations are open in new jersey and long island. crews are working to suck floodwater out of tunnels. some bridges opened up, but police are enforcing a three- person carpool to ease congestion. >> let's go! >> reporter: and more lines swell for buses, food and water. >> you got to be a little patient, because they're slowly trying to recover. >> reporter: millions of people in 11 states are s
, only behind hurricane katrina. 4.6 million customers have no power from east coast to the midwest. and then there is the emotional toll, which seems to rise with each day since the storm. randall pinkston. good morning to you. >> good morning, terrell. we like to talk about the good news. the amazing hard work that is being done to recover, but so much was lost and still so much work remaining to be done. it's all taking a toll. you didn't have to look hard to find frustrated people. there were long lines to get gas. and long lines to get into new york city, as police enforced a three-person per vehicle rule. >> we can't go to the brooklyn bridge. >> reporter: traffic will only get better when all the tunnel and subway lines are clear of water and the pumps are operating 24 hours a day to speed up the process. but one look at this tunnel connecting manhattan and brooklyn shows just how much work is still left to be done. the nights are especially hard for people without electricity. con edison says it will have power back on tomorrow for hundreds of thousands of people in manhatta
at $50 billion. second only to hurricane katrina. more than three million homes and businesses are still without power as the nights grow colder. in parts of new york and new jersey, there's high anxiety as the gas gauge drops to empty and the lines go on for hours. this evening, new york city's mayor reversed himself and canceled sunday's new york city marathon. his hand forced by withering criticism. > they got generators over there to keep the runners warm. we need the help! >> pelley: the starting line for the race was to be on staten island, home of the trayna family where at least 19 people were killed. we have a team of correspondents covering the aftermath of sandy. first, we're going to go to anna werner who was there when more bodies were found on staten island today. anna? er reporter: scott, many people here say that they live in the forgotten borough and that that ts never been more true than in the wake of hurricane sandy. the devastation and pain are everywhere here, in the neighborhood where more people died than any other. 13 feet of water swept across mapleton avenue. >
, but then we all remember the damage that hurricane katrina did to president bush. >> john we heard bill plante report that president obama cancelled that event this morning in orlando, florida, but bill clinton picked up the slack and held that rally now. now we know that bill clinton will be in seven states in the coming week. how much is that a help to the obama team? >> well, without putting too fine a point on it you can imagine the situation in which that helps quite a lot. bill clinton having received better reviews at the democratic convention than the sitting president. bill clinton is hugely popular in the democratic base. so getting those crowds out is important because in the states they take them from the events to the polling places and you grab them and you say, come knock on doors with me this weekend. spend more time volunteering to get these votes out. so it's important that the gathering function of these events continue to happen. and with bill clinton being a big draw he's the best surrogate barack obama could have in these crucial states. >>
that already have post true mat yuck stress from katrina, 9/11, this brings it back some is driven by the media but also politicians that want people to be fearful so they get out of the way and save lives. >> of course. you know you don't want to underpredict and you don't want to overpredict. so they are trying to get that just right. >> what can you do? >> you should watch a show like this where the attitude is measured and nothing is hyped. but when you hear somebody talking like this, there is a storm, doesn't matter what they say. if they are talking like this your adrenaline is up. i saw on the upper west side, there were people coming out of a meat store carrying what looked like half a cow. it is like a mob mentality. i think probably like -- box of cereal and a quart of milk will get you through a couple of day. >> right. >> live on the upper west side. i was many cancerying meat but one of the people that went to the store. why am i here? >> because everybody else is here. there are lines. there is a line. >> i better go get something. what do we do
the army corps of engineers to help. the same group brought in to new orleans after hurricane katrina. >> we expect it to be a challenging engineering problem, and getting that all storm surge back out and up and running again, will take some time and engineering talent and a lot of willpower. >> reporter: they'll also need electric power, something 323,000 customers in new york city are still without. workers are pumping around the clock to remove sea water from underground equipment. but dark skylines and dangerous intersections will be the new normal in lower manhattan and some parts of the outer boroughs for a while longer. utility companies say it might be a week before power is fully restored. city buses here in new york resume full service today to get the city going again. there will be fare-free rides. no charge. also today we saw for the first time ferry service from new jersey resuming. back to you. >> and there is much more than water damage in new york city. there was a devastating fire on the rockaway peninsula where much of a neighborhood burned down early tuesday morni
it the second most expensive storm in u.s. history, after hurricane katrina. >> nearly half of new york city's death from superstorm sandy happened on staten island. homeland secretary janet napolitano is going there today, where people say they're suffering and not getting enough help. anna werner, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as you stand on this street in staten island you can clearly see the path of destruction wrought by hurricane sandy. cars picked up and tossed like toys. that continues throughout the neighborho neighborhood. many residents say they feel ignored. some residents of staten island have started calling it the forgotten burrough. across storm-ravaged staten island, frustrations are mounting. >> we're going to die! we're going to freeze! we've got 90-year-old people. >> reporter: residents are outraged, claiming their community has been ignored in the days following sandy while aid pours in to other parts of new york and new jersey. >> they don't talk about them that much. a lot of people here are hurting much it's upsetting. >> reporter: power is out. hundreds
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)